The Weekly Bible Study Podcast

This summer, we are playing a variety of teaching sessions taken from some of our more popular resources.

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Paul and Circumcision

Paul and Circumcision
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If Paul abolished the commandment of circumcision, doesn’t that prove that the Torah has been abolished?
The debate over the present viability of the Torah for today’s people of God often proceeds from what appears to be an unshakable logic, namely, that if one commandment of God can be shown to have been set aside by the Messiah or His Apostles, then the door is open to argue that many more of the commandments have also been abolished or replaced. From the earliest days of the emerging Christian Church, this logic was applied to the Torah commandment of circumcision. Since Paul was interpreted as teaching against circumcision, the conclusion that the Torah has been set aside was an obvious forthcoming conclusion. For if circumcision was the sign of the covenant given to Israel, and if Paul teaches against circumcision, then clearly the covenant made with Israel has been cast aside, and with it, the Torah.

This lecture covers Chapter 8 of the teaching series, “Why We Keep Torah: Ten Persistent Questions”, by Tim Hegg. For more information about this product, click here.

Warnings About False Prophets & Teachers

Warnings About False Prophets & Teachers
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This short exhortation was taken from the teaching “Interpreting Biblical Prophecy & Interpreting Daniel’s Vision.” Prophecy is one of the most interesting fields of biblical study. In this lecture series Tim Hegg looks at various ways of interpretation when approaching biblical prophecy. In volume 1, Hegg investigates proper methods of interpretation along with exposing practices that have led some astray. In volume 2, Tim takes the interpretation rules he has investigated and applies them to a full study of the book of Daniel! For more information about this product, click here.

Avoiding Junk Scholarship

Avoiding Junk Scholarship
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The Hebrew Roots and Messianic movements have been plagued with misinformation, bad scholarship and downright false information. Many who are coming to an understanding of Torah are hungry for the truth. This hard hitting presentation explains how to discern between the truth of the Scriptures and the tickling of ears by false teachers. To purchase a video of this presentation, click here.

A Brief History of Higher Criticism

A Brief History of Higher Criticism
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“Higher Criticism” is the study of biblical writings to determine their literary history and the purpose and meaning of the authors. Higher criticism is distinguished from “lower criticism” in the following way. Lower criticism deals specifically with issues of the text as it stands; higher criticism is concerned with the history of the text.

Biblical scholarship was ready for the birth of higher criticism not because there were real scholarly advancements being made, but more so because philosophically the time was ripe for new presuppositions and accompanying methodologies. Science had “proven” the unreliability of the Genesis creation account, and Newtonian physics had laid a deistic platform for the denial of miracles. This, together with the rise of German rationalism, nurtured the new higher criticism by which biblical scholars would come to the text as with any other literature—to consider it as purely the creative work of authors without reference to divine action. It was therefore analysed as literature quite apart from any idea of revelation or inspiration, since these both demand an element of the miraculous. The Bible was viewed as religious only in the sense that it was man’s reflection about his world and God.

This excursus on “A Brief History of Higher Criticism” is taken from the teaching series “How We Got Our Bible” (p. 9) by Tim Hegg. For more information about this product, Click Here.

Forgiving as God has Forgiven

Forgiving as God has Forgiven
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7/18/2018

Approaching someone who has erred cannot be done with success if the person bringing the rebuke has not already forgiven the offender. This strengthens the important point that approaching someone who has erred must be done with the goal of restoration. If bitterness or anger still remains in the one sinned against, the confrontation will be condemning rather than inviting, vindictive rather than conciliatory, and hostile instead of loving. When one first forgives, however, the motivation for confrontation will be one of grief for the erring person, and of hope that the confrontation will save them from the pain their sinful actions will bring unless repentance is granted.

This excursus on “Forgiving as God has Forgiven” taken from the “Commentary on The Gospel of Matthew, Volume 3” was originally published in Chapter 9 of “What God Has Joined Together: Biblical Foundations for Marriage” by Tim Hegg (TorahResource, 2007). For more information about these products, Click Here. and Here.

A Short Study on Sanctification (Romans 6:5-11)

A Short Study on Sanctification (Romans 6:5-11)
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7/11/2018

In this teaching session, Tim Hegg emphasizes what Paul wants his readers to understand in Romans 6, which is: if they are one with the Messiah in His death and resurrection, and if the Messiah died only once, never to die again, and now lives forever unto God, then the same must be true of each one who has believed and this is demonstrated through a life of sanctification.

This teaching session is taken from the commentary on “Paul’s Epistle to the Romans, Volume 1” (p. 140-149) by Tim Hegg.
For more information about this product, Click Here.

What Did Paul Mean When He Said, “Our Liberty in Messiah Yeshua”?

What Did Paul Mean When He Said, “Our Liberty in Messiah Yeshua”?
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7/4/2018

The word used in Galatians 2:4, translated “liberty,” is eleutheria. It is found 11 times in the Apostolic Scriptures (Rom. 8:21; 1Cor. 10:29; 2Cor. 3:17; Gal. 2:4; 5:1,13; James 1:25; 2:12; 1Pet. 2:16; 2Pet. 2:19), seven in Paul, two in James and two in Peter. Its appearance four times in Galatians is significant in emphasizing a general topic Paul undoubtedly wishes to apply to the current situation in Galatia. In this session, Tim Hegg examines this word, liberty, and how we can understand this phrase.

This excursus on “Our Liberty in Messiah Yeshua” is taken from Tim Hegg’s commentary on “Paul’s Epistle to the Galatians” (p. 65). For more information about this product, Click Here.

Elder, Overseer, Pastor – Which Title Should We Use?

Elder, Overseer, Pastor – Which Title Should We Use?
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6/27/2018

It has commonly been held that the two terms, elder and overseer, refer to one and the same office within the messianic communities of the Apostolic era. In this short session, Tim Hegg looks at these two titles in context and then he looks at ‘pastor,’ another term that is popular today. He sums up the discussion with a suggestion of which term we should use today and why.

This audio discussion covers a portion of an “Excursus on Elders, Overseers, & Deacons” by Tim Hegg from the in-depth study, “I Will Build My Ekklesia : An Introduction to Ecclesiology” (p. 78). For more information about this product, Click Here.

Ephesians – Week 12

Ephesians – Week 12
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Ephesians 1:20-23

6/20/2018

A Study on The Epistle of Ephesians, with Tim Hegg, is a verse by verse exploration of this Apostolic Book from a Messianic Perspective.

Class Handout: Download PDF

Ephesians – Week 11

Ephesians – Week 11
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Ephesians 1:18b-20

6/13/2018

A Study on The Epistle of Ephesians, with Tim Hegg, is a verse by verse exploration of this Apostolic Book from a Messianic Perspective.

Class Handout: Download PDF

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